Print Reduction

by nathandowningsolent

Figuring out which of my final images were most emblematic of my concept, was a difficult choice. I see the process of print elimination as disheartening and find my personal connection, as creator, guides my final reductive choice. This however, may not be the most well-received image outside of my artistic experience and in line with my concepts. It is necessary to ask of a third-party opinion, this way you get a fresh view on work, that your may be over indulged in. Some had technical elements, that rendered the print pixelated and others fall just short of the concept I intend of conveying.

After feedback from a critic group, my previous collage seemed intention-less. The general opinion was that they were irrelevant and carried no real meaning. I believe they all carried meaning, just not in a way that correlated with one another. I went away and rethought my imagery, the previously used elements of nature were not an aesthetic I wanted to continue with. After visiting Joe Webb’s exhibition, it was clear that I wanted to convey a surreal, pop-art influenced, depiction of a westernised society as victims of commercialist normality, inducing ignorance and a selfish drive for materialisation. The previous collage, including dancers, flowers, hollywood films and iconic actors were all too complex to relate, unless I had gone down the route of the photographs physicality, in which the aesthetics are maybe not as relevant. I chose to continue using the commercialised depictions of the 40s, 50s and 60s, the subjects serve as a patronising caricature of a modern society, simplifying the concept through dated ephemera.

Finals_3

Untitled, Nathan Downing, 2015

Finals_2

Untitled, Nathan Downing, 2015

Untitled, Nathan Downing, 2015

Untitled, Nathan Downing, 2015

Finals_7

Untitled, Nathan Downing, 2015

Untitled, Nathan Downing, 2015

Untitled, Nathan Downing, 2015

I eventually decided on my final print based on the inclusion of the magazine cover. The magazine is a direct representative of commercialism, viewing the art is almost like viewing an advertisement and I liked the idea of the magazine being secondary to the image, as if commercialism’s evasive ways. The bones present the issues outside of our westernised bubble that are far more horrifying than we can ever imagine. The happy stereotypical couple, emblematic of a typically western family are patching their way over the problems, with materialistic commodity. They are ignoring the harsh reality that lies under the floorboards of western economic stability. A harsh reminder that invokes a psychological agitation and moment of self-contemplation.

The other image I found worked well, alongside my final, was the luxurious female atop her moped, staring out at a thunderous explosion. The female is used as an example of a women’s objectivity, so suited to the patriarchic ways of advertising, fixing your eyes on her as if an advert itself. However, she also represents a culture that is ignorant to the realities of this world. She is so blissfully satisfied with her materialistic life that she forgets what’s really happening. The explosion is a representation of the darker internationality that lies outside of a capitalist passage, of which she ignores. Alongside these intentions, was a discovery I made as I when I created my collage. The hands-on approach, that left me cutting books and magazines collected from charity shops, is a physical appropriation that limits the ability to align sources that work together. The cropping of the moped, its tires and the ground in this image is a direct example of two sources that work well together, but, cannot be modified by the digital aid, what you have is what goes, unless you have more! The slight mis-pairing is the reason I chose my final over this particular image.

Advertisements